Introduction to Greece

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2007 at 12:00 am

Greece ruinsThe nation of Greece is in the junction of Europe, Africa and Asia. It is heir to the many heritages of classical Greece, the Byzantine Empire and for about four centuries, the Ottoman rule.

It has been regarded as the cradle of Western civilization and the birthplace of democracy, Western philosophy, literature, political science, major scientific theories and principles, the Olympic games, drama (which includes tragedies and comedies) and a cultural heritage which has been considerably become one of the greatest influencers of Northern Africa and the Middle East as well as the fundamental force for the culture of Europe and what is not called the West.

The country of Greece has mountainous and rocky main lands which characteristically jut out into the sea at the southern end of the Balkans. The coastline of Greece is the tenth longest in the world with 14,880 km and its land boundary is 1,160 km or 721 miles.

A big part of Greece consists of mountains or hills which make the country one of the most mountainous in the whole of Europe. Western Greece has a number of lakes and wetlands which are subdued by the Pindus mountain range. Pindus has a maximum elevation of  2,636 metres (8,648 ft) and it is essentially a prolongation of the Dinaric Alps.

Vast plains are mainly locatd in the prefectures of Thessaly, Central Macedonia and Thrace. They constitute key economic regions as they are one of the few arable places in Greece. Volos and Larissa are the two largest cities of Thessaly.

Expansive plains are primarily located in the prefectures of Thessaly, Central Macedonia and Thrace. They constitute key economic regions as they are among the few arable places in the country. Volos and Larissa are the two largest cities of Thessaly. There are rare marine species of animals which are common to Greece such as the Pinniped Seals as well as the Loggerhead Sea Turtle. They live around mainland Greece while its dense forests are home to the endangered brown bear, the Roe Deer, Wild Goat and the Lynx.

The overall climate of Greece can be classified into three different types that are able to influence the well-defined areas of its territory. The Pindus mountain range is able to affect the climate of the country by enabling the western side of it to become wetter on average than the areas lying to the east of it.

The three distinct types are the Mediterranean, the Alpine and the Temperate types. The first one which is the Mediterranean can be described by mild, wet winters and typical hot, dry summers. The Cyclades, the Dodecanese, Crete, Eastern Peloponessus and other parts of the Sterea Ellada region are the ones which are most affected by this particular type.

The Alpine type is quite dominant primarily in the mountainous regions of Northwestern Greece. The Temperate type is finally the one which affects Central Macedonia and East Macedonia and Thrace. It has cold and damp winters as well as dry summers. With all of these climates, Greece is able to cultivate some of the best wines that there is.